Garrett County and Natural Gas - Risks and Benefits

A selection of categorized links to allow one to assess the risks and benefits of gas development in Garrett Conty.

Garrett County Montage

Shale Gas

Shale Gas

- 1621 - [April 15, 2014] - Natural Gas Now, Victor Furman - "A Test for Shale Gas Skeptics – Part II"
"Misinformation and speculation seem to be at the heart of what worries so many of our shale gas skeptics here in New York State. Multiple, supposedly grass roots, groups funded by the same big money sources out of New York City, San Francisco and Planet Ithaca keep throwing out assertions and innuendo that have absolutely no basis in fact."
- 1652 - [August 3, 2013] - U.S. Energy Information Administration, eia - "Review of Emerging Resources" U.A. Shale Gas and Shale Oil Plays"
"To gain a better understanding of the potential U.S. domestic shale gas and shale oil resources, EIA commissioned INTEK, Inc. to
develop an assessment of onshore Lower 48 States technically recoverable shale gas and shale oil resources. This paper briefly
describes the scope, methodology, and key results of the report and discusses the key assumptions that underlie the results."
- 1857 - [May 11, 2015] - FierceEnergy, Jaclyn Brandt - "U.S. and Canada are the obvious leaders in shale development"
"Despite the large amounts of shale oil and gas around the world, the United States and Canada are the only two countries that have produced commercial quantities of both. According to the Institute for Energy Research (IER), there is an estimated 7,299 trillion cubic feet of shale gas resources, and 345 billion barrels of shale oil, worldwide. That is compared to the 120 trillion cubic feet of shale gas is consumed each year."
- 1864 - [May 13, 2015] - Shell Oil, Shell Oil - "The Origins of Oil and Gas"
"The story of oil and gas begins hundreds of millions of years ago when the Earth was covered in swamplands filled with huge trees and the seas were teaming with microscopic plants and animals. The oil and gas deposits started forming about 350 to 290 million years ago during the Carboniferous Period, which gets its name from the basic element
in oil and gas: carbon. A popular belief is that oil comes from dead dinosaurs. It doesn’t. The giant reptiles lived mostly from 250 to 65 million years ago, and most scientists believe oil actually comes from the tiniest plants and animals that preceded them."