Garrett County and Natural Gas - Risks and Benefits

A selection of categorized links to allow one to assess the risks and benefits of gas development in Garrett Conty.

Garrett County Montage

In the News

The following is a list of articles that may impact gas development. For now, they are not categorized. The date listed is a best estimate of when the article was first published.

- 1002 - [January 14, 2015] - NGI's Shale Daily, Jamison Cocklin - "West Virginia University to Study Drilling Impacts at Experimental Shale Site"
"The West Virginia University School of Public Health will join a federal project announced in November to conduct air, noise, occupational safety and health monitoring over the next five years at an experimental shale gas drilling site in Morgantown."
- 1007 - [November 26, 2014] - EcoWatch, Anastasia Pantsios - "Maryland Governor O’Malley Is Ready to Allow Fracking in His State"
"Outgoing Maryland Governor Martin O’Malley ... raised the ire of environmentalists—with his announcement that he is ready to allow fracking in the state, where it has so far been banned.
O’Malley said that energy companies that want to frack in the state will have to abide by restrictive environmental and public health regulations, including limits on drilling locations and oversight of risks to air pollution and water contamination. He said he will unveil the final regulations ...."
- 1016 - [January 14, 2015] - Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Laura Legere and Anya Litvak - "Obama sets date to cut emissions of methane from gas wells"
"The Obama administration set a goal Wednesday of cutting methane emissions from the oil and gas sector by nearly half in the next 10 years with a proposal targeting new wells.
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said it will propose rules this summer to limit methane emissions from new oil and gas wells, compressor stations and other sources.
It also will issue guidelines for cutting emissions of smog-forming compounds from existing oil and gas facilities in areas of the country that need to improve their ozone air quality levels, including a block of northeastern states that includes Pennsylvania.
The Obama administration’s goal is to cut methane emissions from the oil and gas sector by 40 to 45 percent from 2012 levels by 2025, although administration officials acknowledged that the steps they proposed Wednesday, which also include standards for new wells on federal lands and other measures, would not be enough to meet that goal."
- 1017 - [January 15, 2015] - Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Don Hopey - "High radiation not a byproduct of shale drilling, DEP finds"
"A multi-year study by the state Department of Environmental Protection has found there is a low risk of radiation exposure related to shale gas development.
The study also said “there are site-specific circumstances and situations where the use of personal protective equipment by workers or other controls should be evaluated.”
It recommended that radiological discharge limits be considered for waste treatment facilities handling drilling wastes, and the review of long-term waste disposal rules.
It said further study is needed to determine the environmental and health impacts of spreading salty drilling waste water, called “brine,” on roadways to suppress dust."
- 1031 - [January 14, 2015] - CBS Pittsburgh, Andy Sheehan - "Cheap Fuel Prices Hurting Shale Gas Industry"
"Natural gas prices are falling in Western Pennsylvania and while it may be good for consumers, it may not be good for the Marcellus Shale gas industry.
The falling prices have become a thorn in the side of the burgeoning shale gas industry and production has now scaled back from 140 active rigs three-years ago, to just 75 today."
- 1045 - [January 14, 2015] - Clean Technica, Sandy Dechert - "Obama Administration Announces Methane Plans"
"Back in 1971, the world’s scientists thought that methane directly affected neither the climate nor the biosphere and was relatively unimportant. However, in the 2001 climate report from the UN, the experts were whistling a different tune–based on multiple lines of evidence discovered during the intervening 30 years.
The government’s detailed Strategy to Cut Methane Emissions ... has announced a goal of cutting methane emissions by 40-45% from 2012 levels by 2025. The methane plans do not not cover pipeline transmission and gas distribution losses, which can be considerable."
- 1047 - [December 8, 2014] - wwwYPR 88.1 FM, Christopher Connelly - "As Maryland Moves Forward With Fracking, Questions Remain"
"Gov. Martin O'Malley is ready to allow the controversial natural gas drilling technique known as hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, and he’s poised to propose the strictest standards in the country. But even after years of deliberation and contention, fracking in Maryland still holds more questions than answers."
- 1048 - [Decmber 12, 2014] - Associated Press, The Daily Record - "Gov. candidate Hogan discusses clemency, drug"
"Hogan said he’d seriously consider prohibiting vertical drilling for shale gas in the Deep Creek watershed in far western Maryland, a position favored by the Garrett County Board of Realtors and the Deep Creek Lake Property Owners Association to protect the tranquility of the area. Prohibiting vertical drilling within the watershed wouldn’t prevent companies from drilling vertically on the perimeter and then horizontally to reach the gas. Brown said this weekend he would support natural gas drilling, after studies conclude it can be done without damaging residents’ health or the environment"
- 1049 - [December 22. 2014] - Press & Sun-Bulletin, Tom Wilber - "How fracking got stopped in N.Y."
"It was no surprise that the news was emotionally charged. But, for people on both sides of the issue, it was an abrupt endpoint of an epic policy fight that began nearly seven years ago." "New York's shale gas story will be cast in history as one of false starts, near misses, and empty promises. From the beginning, some harbored great expectations for a shale gas boom in the Southern Tier. In the end it was a bust that never got off the ground."
- 1050 - [January 10, 2015] - Baltimore Sun, Timothy E. Wheeler - "Maryland fracking rules proposed, but Hogan gets final say"
"As expected, the O'Malley administration has moved ahead with regulations intended to ensure safe drilling for natural gas in western Maryland. It will be up to Gov.-elect Larry Hogan, though, whether they get imposed.
On Thursday night, the Department of the Environment forwarded its 43-page proposal for new conditions on drilling to a legislative committee that reviews regulations. The move comes less than a week after an advisory commission took public comment on an extensive set of safeguards it recommended before gas exploration and extraction is allowed again."
- 1051 - [January 10, 2015] - Telegraph Forum, Gannett Ohio, Jona Ison - "Low gas prices may slow fracking"
"Crude oil prices have been on a steady decline since July, dropping more than 50 percent. The decrease is good for consumers and even the economy in the short term because it boosts expendable income. But the hydraulic fracturing services market is bracing for a downturn in 2015, according to PacWest Consulting Partners, a consulting and marketing intelligence firm specializing in the energy, industrial and resources sectors"
- 1052 - [January 12, 2015] - Shale Energy Insider, James Perkins - "New York fracking ban has little effect on natural gas supply"
"Following New York state’s decision to ban fracking, industry experts and scientists have said that the impact on the national supply will be limited and has been “hardly seen as a big loss” as a potential market for natural gas expansion. Penn State University geologist Terry Engelder, who has surveyed the Marcellus Shale has said that “even if the ban were lifted right now, I doubt you’d see very much activity”. Engelder’s assertion is based upon figures suggesting that the reserves available in New York are dwarfed by those in the nearby states of Pennsylvania and West Virginia in the Marcellus Shale play."
- 1053 - [January 13, 2015] - Food & Water Watch, Press Release - "Citing Growing Science, a Broad Coalition of 61 Health, Environment, Faith and Advocacy Groups Unite to Call on the State Legislature to Pass a Long-Term Moratorium on Fracking in Maryland"
"Seeking to protect Marylanders from the public health and environmental risks of fracking, 61 organizations are calling for a long-term moratorium on high-volume hydraulic fracturing in Maryland. In a position statement released today, the groups emphasized that, “there is no evidence that the state can regulate hydraulic fracturing in a way that adequately protects public health, natural resources, or the economy."
- 1054 - [January 15, 2015] - U.S. EPA, U.S. EPA - "ACT SHEET: Administration Takes Steps Forward on Climate Action Plan by Announcing Actions to Cut Methane Emissions"
"The steps announced today are also a sound economic and public health strategy because reducing methane emissions means capturing valuable fuel that is otherwise wasted and reducing other harmful pollutants – a win for public health and the economy. Achieving the Administration’s goal would save up to 180 billion cubic feet of natural gas in 2025, enough to heat more than 2 million homes for a year and continue to support businesses that manufacture and sell cost-effective technologies to identify, quantify, and reduce methane emissions."
- 1170 - [January 27, 2015] - Marcellus.com, Marcellus.com - "Less drilling, more dealing"
"Some industry experts predict 2015 may turn out to be a year of less drilling and more dealing, as low oil and natural gas prices force some companies out of the market and those remaining look to pick up the crumbs.
“There will be a lot of companies looking to get a deal for pennies on the dollar,” said Carl Larry, director of business development, oil and gas, at Frost & Sullivan in Houston, Texas."
- 1179 - [January 7, 2015] - Marcellus.com, Danielle Wente | Shale Plays Media - "New fracking technology in the works"
"One question that has been asked and wondered about is whether or not the chemicals used in hydraulic fracking manage to contaminate drinking water supplies. But testing drinking water for contaminants and being able to link it back to gas drilling has been rather challenging.
Teddy Guenin and Ashwin Amurthur, both studying in the bioengineering department, are finalists for a $5000 prize offered by the University. The two have submitted the idea of using graphene to measure minuscule amounts of hydrocarbon benzene. Graphene, which was developed an estimated ten years ago, has the ability to measure benzene down to the pico-molar level."
- 1180 - [January 27, 2015] - Marcellus.com, Cumberland Times-News - "Groups call for legislative fracking ban"
"A coalition of 79 organizations, including several local organizations, is calling for legislative action to ban hydraulic fracturing in Maryland.
“Based on what we know now, we believe that fracking endangers public health and is the wrong approach to building a robust Maryland economy and a clean energy future. We urge Maryland’s legislature to pass an extended moratorium in 2015,” the statement, released Jan.17, reads. The document was released by the Chesapeake Physicians for Social Responsibility and Food & Water Watch."
- 1184 - [January 27, 2015] - Bakken.com, Bakken.com - "West Virginia, Ohio visitors seek guidance in North Dakota"
"Government and economic development leaders from West Virginia and Ohio are visiting northwestern North Dakota to see firsthand what it’s like to deal with an energy boom.
“Make sure you look far ahead enough,” Minot City Engineer Lance Meyer told the visitors while discussing long-range infrastructure planning. Minot has identified nearly $815 million in needed water, sewer, transportation, airport, landfill, buildings and flood control projects through 2019, he said."
- 1194 - [January 28,2015] - Bakken.com, Dina Cappiello | The Associated Press - "House passes bill aimed at expediting natural gas exports"
"Continuing its charge on energy, the Republican-controlled House on Wednesday passed a bill aimed at expediting approvals of natural gas exports.
In a 277-133 vote, the House approved a bill giving the Energy Department a 30-day deadline to authorize natural gas exports from facilities after they are reviewed and approved.
It’s the third energy-related bill passed by the House this Congress. They’ve also approved bills authorizing construction of the Keystone XL oil pipeline and fast-tracking new natural gas pipelines."
- 1213 - [January 29, 2015] - wwwYPR, CHRISTOPHER CONNELLY - "After Years Of Study, Deep Divisions Over Fracking's Risks Remain"
"For more than three years, a state commission has been studying whether to allow hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, to get at natural gas trapped in the Marcellus shale beneath the mountains of Western Maryland. Now, the commission is done, state agencies have proposed rules, but commissioners still don’t agree on the central question of whether we can frack safely.
At the center of the commission’s work is this question: How much risk is too much risk? There’s a lot of risk associated with blasting water, sand and some pretty nasty chemicals into rock thousands of feet underground to get natural gas– But can the state regulate those risks down to an acceptable level?
But some commissioners are crying foul on the study process. Ann Bristow, appointed as a representative of a local environmental organization, says the O’Malley Administration failed to put public health front and center. The state’s health department wasn’t officially part of the process, and only partway through was a public health official appointed.
But Sen. George Edwards, a Republican who represents Western Maryland and also sat on the study commission, downplays concerns about public health consequences as just another delaying tactic from people who oppose fracking outright. There’s risk involved in any industry he says, risks can never be brought to zero, but that shouldn’t stop drilling."
- 1215 - [January 29, 2015] - wwwYPR, CHRISTOPHER CONNELLY - "After Years Of Study, Deep Divisions Over Fracking's Risks Remain"
"For more than three years, a state commission has been studying whether to allow hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, to get at natural gas trapped in the Marcellus shale beneath the mountains of Western Maryland. Now, the commission is done, state agencies have proposed rules, but commissioners still don’t agree on the central question of whether we can frack safely.
At the center of the commission’s work is this question: How much risk is too much risk? There’s a lot of risk associated with blasting water, sand and some pretty nasty chemicals into rock thousands of feet underground to get natural gas– But can the state regulate those risks down to an acceptable level?
But some commissioners are crying foul on the study process. Ann Bristow, appointed as a representative of a local environmental organization, says the O’Malley Administration failed to put public health front and center. The state’s health department wasn’t officially part of the process, and only partway through was a public health official appointed.
But Sen. George Edwards, a Republican who represents Western Maryland and also sat on the study commission, downplays concerns about public health consequences as just another delaying tactic from people who oppose fracking outright. There’s risk involved in any industry he says, risks can never be brought to zero, but that shouldn’t stop drilling."
- 1234 - [December 17, 2014] - The New York Times, THOMAS KAPLAN - "Citing Health Risks, Cuomo Bans Fracking in New York State"
"Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo’s administration announced on Wednesday that it would ban hydraulic fracturing in New York State because of concerns over health risks, ending years of debate over a method of extracting natural gas."
- 1248 - [January 19, 2015] - FoxNews.com Politics, Kelley Beaucar Vlahos - "Study used to bolster NY fracking ban developed by anti-fracking 'activists'"
"New York state’s controversial new fracking ban was bolstered in part by research written and peer-reviewed by scientists with ties to the anti-fracking movement – drawing criticism that their views were not disclosed when the ban was announced last month."
- 1252 - [February 3, 2015] - Bakken.com, Zach Koppang | Shale Plays Media - "ABC to produce Bakken “Boom” drama"
"The ABC television network recently ordered pilots for four new dramas, including a series centered in the Bakken oil patch, reports Variety.com.
The series will be produced by ABC Studios and revolves around one of the largest oil discoveries in the nation’s history. The series, titled “Boom,” focuses on western North Dakota’s oilfields and the largest shift in the region’s politics and economics since the gold rush of 1849."
- 1259 - [February 6, 2015] - WBALTV, David Collins - "Fracking opponents propose 8-year moratorium - Supporters of moratorium seek more studies"
"Opponents of fracking introduced a bill in Annapolis to put a stop on the practice for eight years.
Opponents contend there isn't enough research to ensure that residents won't be harmed by fracking, a method used to extract natural gas from shale.
"That money stays in the counties, stays with the local people, enables farmers to buy new tractors, paint their barns, maintain the farm, keep the farm," said Delegate Wendell Beitzel, R-Garrett County."
- 1260 - [NA] - Don't Frack Maryland, Don't Frack Maryland - "Fracking isn't safe, and scientists know it."
"Fracking, short for high-volume hydraulic fracturing, is an unconventional and risky process of pumping millions of gallons of water – mixed with sand and hundreds of known and unknown toxic chemicals – at high pressure deep, underground to break apart shale rock deposits to extract gas and oil. Drilling and fracking have led to widespread reports of groundwater contamination, surface water contamination, significant air quality problems, public health concerns, economic losses to communities, earthquake activity and a host of other problems across the country."
- 1262 - [January 17th, 2015] - DC Bureau, Peter Mantius - "Maryland Politics Trumps Science on Fracking"
"Two ambitious Democratic governors in the East faced the same tough choice late last year on whether to allow energy companies to extract natural gas from shale formations through high-volume hydrofracking. One said yes. The other said no.
Neither state has much natural gas to tap at current market prices. Even so, the decisions by Gov. Martin O’Malley of Maryland and Gov. Andrew Cuomo of New York have national implications because they sat in judgment of the importance of the latest independent science. While environmental and medical experts were pointing to dozens of new peer-reviewed studies showing explicit health and safety risks, the energy industry was clinging to its assertions that all fracking risks are manageable."
- 1263 - [February 5, 2015] - Baltimore Sun, Timothy B. Wheeler - "Health, environmental groups seek fracking moratorium"
"Public health and environmental advocates gathered in Annapolis Thursday to push for a long-term moratorium on hydraulic fracturing for natural gas, arguing that more time is needed to look into health threats posed by the drilling process commonly called "fracking."
Regulations that would impose a variety of best practices and safeguards on drilling for shale gas were proposed in the final days of the O'Malley administration, and are out for public comment.
The rules were drawn up by the O'Malley administration as an advisory commission he appointed neared the end of a three-year study of fracking's risks. But critics, including some members of the advisory commission, contend the study gave short shrift to health concerns."
- 1264 - [February 6, 2015] - the Almanac, Scott Beveridge and Mike Jones - "Catastrophe avoided at Marcellus well pad fire"
"A catastrophe was avoided Feb. 4 when a large fire broke out at a Marcellus Shale natural gas well pad because the North Strabane Township drilling operation was only in the beginning stages, officials said.
The DEP was still attempting Feb. 5 to determine how much oil leaked from a hydraulic line and what caused the substance to catch fire at Range Resources’ Jeffries Elisabeth pad off Ross Road.
Regulators also were investigating to determine how much oil leaked from the ruptured line and what it was connected to on the pad, Poister said."
- 1269 - [February 1, 2012] - The Athens News, David DeWitt - "Commissioners hear it from both sides about fracking"
"Landowners and activists crowded the offices of the Athens County Commissioners Tuesday morning to voice their opinions about a proposed resolution supporting stricter regulation of horizontal hydraulic fracturing in Ohio and the nation.
The deep shale oil and gas drilling technique has been at the center of controversy locally, as well as regionally and nationally. The county commissioners have said that they're working to find a compromise that balances environmental and economic interest"
- 1309 - [FEBRUARY 9, 2015] - Earth Island Journal, Adam Federman, Contributing Editor, Earth Island Journal - "After the Fracking - What’s next for New York’s environmental movement?"
"It’s been just over a month since Governor Andrew Cuomo’s administration announced that fracking would be banned in New York State. This decisive victory for environmental activists who had campaigned for years to keep the industry out of the state also presents a dilemma: Without a high profile issue to rally around, will the state’s environmental movement be able to achieve more far-reaching goals?"
- 1320 - [February 9, 2015] - BloombergBusiness, David Wethe - "Drillers Take Second Crack at Fracking Old Wells to Cut Cost"
"Beset by falling prices, the oil industry is looking at about 50,000 existing wells in the U.S. that may be candidates for a second wave of fracking, using techniques that didn’t exist when they were first drilled.
New wells can cost as much as $8 million, while re-fracking costs about $2 million, significant savings when the price of crude is hovering close to $50 a barrel, according to Halliburton Co., the world’s biggest provider of hydraulic fracturing services."
- 1321 - [Fegruary 10, 2015] - EagleFordTexas.com, Reuters - "U.S. burns record natgas to generate power in January"
"U.S. electric companies in the lower 48 states gobbled up record amounts of natural gas to generate power in January 2015 as low prices made it more economic to burn gas instead of coal.
Power generators used an average 23.1 billion cubic feet per day of gas in January 2015, up 13 percent from the 20.5 bcfd average in January 2014, according to Thomson Reuters Analytics.
That was the most gas consumed by the power sector during the month of January on record, according to federal data going back to 1973."
- 1330 - [February 11, 2015] - Marcellus.com, DAVID CONTI | The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review - "Study: Minority of facilities produce most natural gas methane emissions"
"Leaky equipment at a small number of natural gas compressors, processors and pipeline facilities account for a big chunk of the methane escaping into the air, according to the latest reports from a national collaboration between energy companies and the Environmental Defense Fund.
Two peer-reviewed studies published Tuesday in Environmental Science & Technology involved researchers from Carnegie Mellon and Colorado State universities taking field measurements at a combined 176 facilities in 13 states. They come as regulators look to crack down on emissions of the greenhouse gas and as companies tout an industry-wide reduction over the past three years."
- 1333 - [February 11, 2015] - WNEP16 The News Station, Stacy Lange - "Bringing Energy Careers to the Classroom"
"Marcellus Shale sits more than 5,000 feet below Valley View High School in Archbald, but on ground level, junior students had a chance to pick some up and learn about what it does in natural gas production.
They also learned about electricity and water use and about how it’s wasted. That lesson really resonated with some students like Kylee Bushta.
“Many interesting things about how energy is transported here, and the way we can renew and not waste it,” Bushta said.
The students learned from eight different speakers at the Junior Achievement program about energy. The presenters were from the big wigs in the energy world. Teachers hope the lessons about the natural gas industry would stick with some students in particular."
- 1373 - [February 13, 2015] - Wolf Street - Howling about Business and Finance, Wolf Richter - "The Fracking Bust Hits Home"
"Never before has drilling for oil collapsed this far this fast.
The word “boom” can never be thought of as a stand-alone concept that everyone loves, particularly governments because they get to rake in the big bucks. It’s always attached to its miserable twin that no one wants to see, the “bust.” They come invariably in cycles, one after the other. You can’t have one without the other. It’s just a question of time. And in the world of fracking, it’s no different."
- 1374 - [February 14, 2015] - Budiness Insider, Wolf Richter, Wolf Street - "Fracking has collapsed"
"The word “boom” can never be thought of as a stand-alone concept that everyone loves, particularly governments because they get to rake in the big bucks.
It’s always attached to its miserable twin that no one wants to see, the “bust.” They come invariably in cycles, one after the other. You can’t have one without the other. It’s just a question of time. And in the world of fracking, it’s no different."
- 1377 - [February 16, 2015] - TribLive | News, Gideon Bradshaw - "In Monroeville, Gov. Wolf pushes his proposed natural gas extraction tax"
"Public schools in Allegheny County have lost about $47 million in state funding since 2010-11 and could recoup some of that money if lawmakers support a tax on natural gas drilling, Gov. Tom Wolf said Monday during a visit to Monroeville.
With several Democratic officials by his side, Wolf made a push for his tax proposal, saying Pennsylvania ranks 45th in the country for education funding.
“This is an effort to tap into a natural resource that is ours, lies beneath our feet, and turn that into something that creates skills and new jobs for our economy,” Wolf said."
- 1414 - [February 18, 2015] - The Baltimore Sun, Erin Cox - "Frosh wades into fracking fight"
"Attorney General Brian E. Frosh entered the fight over hydraulic fracturing in Maryland on Wednesday, urging state lawmakers to pass a bill with liability standards so tough that critics and some supporters consider it a de facto fracking ban.
In the absence of "gold standard" regulations to monitor the industry, Frosh said, Maryland would need to find another way to protect residents and the environment.
"If we're not going to have those regulations adopted, then it makes sense to have strict liability," Frosh said. "I'm not sure it's a de facto ban. But it poses to drillers: if this really is safe, go ahead and do it.""
- 1415 - [February 25, 2015] - HeraldMailMedia.com, NA - "Rally to back bill against Western Md. fracking"
" Bob Orr is worried what fracking might do to Deep Creek Lake. Tiffany Blackden is scared for her son.
The two are among a growing number of concerned business owners and residents in Western Maryland, which is targeted for future natural gas drilling.
"Economically, we have a golden goose in Western Maryland: Deep Creek Lake," said Orr, owner of Offlake Rental & Leasing. "It is our economy, it is our industry. People who come to Garrett County come here because of how beautiful everything is. There's nothing beautiful about Marcellus Shale exploration."
Tuesday, members of Don't Frack Maryland plan to rally in Annapolis ahead of a hearing on a proposed prohibition on fracking in Maryland. "
- 1425 - [NA] - PBS NewsHour, Rebeccaa Jacobson - "Fracking brine leak in North Dakota reaches Missouri River, prompts state Democrats to call for more regulation"
"A pipeline leak near Williston, North Dakota, that began January 6 has spilled 3 million gallons of brine — a byproduct of hydraulic fracturing. The leak has reached the Missouri River.
It’s the largest saltwater spill in the state’s history. Brine is considered toxic; it is saltier than seawater and often contains other fracking fluids and petroleum."
- 1453 - [August 1, 2012] - HUFF POST GREEN, Wenonah Hauter - "Two Huge Stories on Fracking You Probably Missed This Week"
"It seems that the fracking industry's biggest concern is keeping their operations secret. Whether they're talking about the chemicals in their frac fluid, how they pay (or don't pay) royalties to landowners, or even whether doctors can tell their patients what they're treating, industry representatives have pushed to keep their secrets. The industry has been pretty good at keeping people in the dark.
But two recent disclosures have shed some light on how the industry manages to obscure the details of its operations."
- 1454 - [March 5, 2015] - The Washington Post, Associated Press - "Western Md. Realtors support fracking moratorium bills"
"Real-estate brokers in far western Maryland are supporting a proposal in the Maryland General Assembly for an eight-year moratorium on hydraulic fracturing for natural gas pending further study.
The Garrett County Board of Realtors expressed concern Tuesday about the possible impact of fracking on public health. They say fears of health problems from well-water contamination can reduce home values by at least 20 percent."
- 1494 - [August 20, 2012] - Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Sean D. Hamill | Pittsburgh Post-Gazette - "Pa. records on oil and gas wells are incomplete"
"Only about a quarter of drilled wells had records entered into the state’s database, state Sen. Jim Brewster’s staffers found when they began researching the pipe used in Pennsylvania gas and oil wells.
Out of 4,473 wells drilled from Oct. 5, 2012 — when Act 13 went into effect — until Oct. 30, 2014, when Mr. Brewster’s review began, his staff found only 1,196 well record forms.
And of the 1,196 well record forms found on the Pennsylvania Internet Record Imaging System, only 709 of them included country-of-origin information.
Why so few?"
- 1517 - [March 20, 2015] - SkyTruth, SkyTruth - "Federal Bureau’s Rule on Fracking Violates President’s Open Data Policy"
"Today the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) consigned the American public to remain ill-informed about hydraulic fracturing taking place on millions of acres of public property. The Bureau’s long-awaited “fracking rule” designates FracFocus, an industry-funded data repository, as the mechanism for public disclosure of chemicals used in hydraulic fracturing at oil and gas drilling sites on federal and Indian lands. The ruling also affects 58 million acres of "split-estate" lands where the BLM controls the minerals but the surface is owned by private citizens, states, or other non-Federal entities."
- 1549 - [March 20, 2015] - Pocono Record, Gary R. Blockus | The Morning Call (TNS) - "Trout Unlimited keeps eye on shale gas drilling impact"
" Michaels Creek and Martins Creek in the Poconos are about to get some very important oversight.
Trained members of the Brodhead Chapter of Trout Unlimited will begin monitoring a variety of data in those streams and turn the results over to the Pennsylvania Council of TU. The council will include the information in a national database to keep track of the shale gas drilling industry's potential impact on streams."
- 1569 - [March 24, 2015] - food & water watch, Ryanne Waters - "Maryland House Passes 3-Year Moratorium on Fracking"
"The Maryland House today passed legislation that would enact a 3-year moratorium on fracking statewide with a 93 – 45 vote in favor. The bill, the Protect Our Health and Communities Act (HB 449), was sponsored by Delegate David Fraser-Hidalgo. Throughout the 2015 legislative session, a flood of support for the moratorium has come from health professionals, business owners and residents throughout the state. The bill passed with wide bipartisan support on the House floor, and delegates, advocates and concerned residents immediately turned their calls to the State Senate to act in kind."
- 1573 - [March 10, 2015] - Bakken.com, The Associated Press - "Statoil, W.Va. agree on deal for drilling under Ohio River"
"West Virginia and Statoil have agreed on a deal for natural gas and oil drilling under the Ohio River.
The Intelligencer and Wheeling News-Register reports that Norway-based Statoil plans to drill on about 474 acres of state-owned land under the river in Marshall and Wetzel counties.
Statoil has agreed to pay an average price of $8,732 per acre. The state also will receive 20 percent production royalties."
- 1587 - [March 25, 2015] - EnergyInDepth - Marcellus, Joe Massaro - "Anti-Fracking Groups Spread Misinformation in Maryland"
"Earlier this week, a number of anti-fracking groups led by Food & Water Watch and a handful of business owners staged a protest in Annapolis, Md. to deliver signed petitions to legislators calling for a moratorium on hydraulic fracturing in the state. Judging from the tweets during the event, it seems that none of the speakers have ever visited Pennsylvania, where shale development has been taking place safely for over a decade."
- 1645 - [NA] - The New York Times, Richard A. Oppel Jr. and Michael Wines - "As Quakes Rattle Oklahoma, Fingers Point to Oil and Gas Industry"
" Yanked without warning from a deep sleep, Jennifer Lin Cooper, whose family has lived near here for more than a half-century, could think only that the clamor enveloping her house was coming from a helicopter landing on her roof. She was wrong.
A 5.0-magnitude earthquake — the first of three as strong or stronger over several days in November 2011 — had peeled the brick facade from the $117,000 home she bought the year before. Ms. Cooper, 36, could not get out until her father pried a stuck storm door off the front entrance. Repairs have so far cost $12,000 and forced her to take a second job, at night, to pay the bill."
- 1663 - [March 7, 2011] - Baltimore Fishbowl, Laurel Peltier - "Un-Fracking-Believable: Gas Drilling Could Be Banned in Maryland for 2 Years"
"Even Edward Norton, the Maryland-born actor, voiced his opposition to fracking in radio spots.
When I heard that Maryland’s Senate voted 45-2 on Monday night to ban fracking for two and half years, I almost fell off my chair. This bill didn’t suffer the usual fracking bill death in the Senate. Even Republicans from Western Maryland voted in favor. What happened? Taking a peek into the series of events that surrounded the fracking ban gives hope that political compromise can happen and that everyday citizens play a part in our country’s energy policy. Word is the Senate’s 2-year ban bill version was approved in the House committee last night. The next question is: Will Hogan sign it?"
- 1720 - [NA] - StarGazette, Jon Campbell - "Final fracking report coming soon, state DEC chief says"
" New York is about to take its next step toward a ban on large-scale hydraulic fracturing.
A several-thousand-page document that will lay out the rationale for prohibiting fracking is "being printed as we speak," state Environmental Conservation Commissioner Joseph Martens said Wednesday."
- 1749 - [April 22, 2015] - abc NEWS, Regina Garcia Cano Associated Press - "Smithsonian Series Chronicles Lives of Oil Patch Residents"
"A documentary chronicling the lives of residents and workers in the oil-rich region of North Dakota and Montana that has created a modern-day gold rush will start airing Sunday on the Smithsonian Channel."
- 1785 - [April 23, 2915] - Courier Express, Katie Weidenboerner - "A look at the future of Marcellus Shale"
"Whether the Marcellus Shale industry will boom or bust in Elk County has yet to be determined. However, an educator from the Penn State University Extension offered county residents and officials a portrait of what development in the rural county could escalate to."
- 1789 - [April 30, 2015] - The Baltimore Sun, Timothy B. Wheeler - "Study links air pollution in Baltimore, DC to fracking outside Maryland"
"Even though Maryland has yet to permit any hydraulic fracturing for natural gas, emissions linked to the controversial drilling technique have been detected in the air in Baltimore and Washington, according to a new study."
- 1868 - [5/14/2015] - Democrat and Chronicle, Jon Campbell, Albany bureau - "After nearly 7 years, NY releases final fracking review"
"Gov. Andrew Cuomo's administration Wednesday released a years-in-the-making environmental review that lays the groundwork for prohibiting large-scale hydraulic fracturing for natural gas.
The state Department of Environmental Conservation released a final version of the roughly 2,000-page document, known as the Supplemental Generic Environmental Impact Statement or SGEIS, just after 4 p.m."
- 1895 - [September 2014] - Bakken.com, John Kemp | Reuters - "How do you lose 100 million barrels of oil?"
"Oil-market watchers are struggling to reconcile the large estimated oversupply in the market with the much smaller buildup of reported inventories and narrowing contango in futures prices.
Some blame the barrel counters who compile official statistics on supply, demand and stocks. But the truth is that information on the world oil market is incomplete and it is easy for hundreds of millions of barrels of oil to disappear from the supply chain without being counted.
According to the three main statistical agencies, the global market has been oversupplied by between 1.5 million and 2.5 million barrels per day (bpd) since the start of the year."
- 1899 - [May 20, 2015] - Bakken.com, Zach Koppang | Shale Plays Media - "Discussing small business and economics in the Bakken"
"This week academics converged on Dickinson State University’s Strom Center to discuss the local perceptions of the energy boom and the economic impact it’s had on the region in recent years.
The Bakken Researchers Convening illustrated some of the most prominent economic issues the shale revolution has brought to the region, including the stress placed on existing infrastructure, government and social services as well as local income and wealth. As reported by The Dickinson Press, Rob Grunewald, event host and economist for the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, said, “Part of this is because this is a unique economic phenomenon to have so much growth so quickly.”"
- 1942 - [March 27, 2014] - EcoWatch, Anastasia Pantsios - "Is the Fracking Boom Coming to an End?"
"Since fracking began its boom period in the last decade, its supporters have promoted it as the answer to all of the U.S.’s energy issues. It would free us from dependence on foreign oil, they said, thereby strengthening national security. And in fact, the U.S. has become the world’s largest exporter of fossil fuels, while prices at the gas pump have dropped steeply as fracked oil and gas production has exploded. "