Garrett County and Natural Gas - Risks and Benefits

A selection of categorized links to allow one to assess the risks and benefits of gas development in Garrett Conty.

Garrett County Montage

Groundwater

Groundwater contamination was the fist consequence identified with natural gas drilling. The fracking process is identified with this. These are links that try to identify this could happen.

- 1081 - [October 15, 2014] - ScienceDaily, Dawn Fuller - "A unique approach to monitoring groundwater supplies near Ohio fracking sites"
"A University of Cincinnati research project is taking a groundbreaking approach to monitoring groundwater resources near fracking sites in Ohio. Claire
First launched in Carroll County in 2012, the GRO team of researchers is examining methane levels and origins of methane in private wells and springs before, during and after the onset of fracking. The team travels to the region to take water samples four times a year."
- 1087 - [October 7, 2014] - DESMOGBLOG.COM, Mike Gaworecki - "Confirmed: California Aquifers Contaminated With Billions Of Gallons of Fracking Wastewater"
"After California state regulators shut down 11 fracking wastewater injection wells last July over concerns that the wastewater might have contaminated aquifers used for drinking water and farm irrigation, the EPA ordered a report within 60 days.
It was revealed yesterday that the California State Water Resources Board has sent a letter to the EPA confirming that at least nine of those sites were in fact dumping wastewater contaminated with fracking fluids and other pollutants into aquifers protected by state law and the federal Safe Drinking Water Act."
- 1946 - [June 5, 2015] - USGS, USGA - "Dissolved Methane in New York Groundwater"
"New York State is underlain by numerous bedrock formations of Cambrian to Devonian age that produce natural gas and to a lesser extent oil. The first commercial gas well in the United States was dug in the early 1820s in Fredonia, south of Buffalo, New York, and produced methane from Devonian-age black shale. Methane naturally discharges to the land surface at some locations in New York."