Garrett County and Natural Gas - Risks and Benefits

A selection of categorized links to allow one to assess the risks and benefits of gas development in Garrett Conty.

Garrett County Montage

Accidents and Catastrophic Events

References to accidents that have happened in the gas development industry. This can cover well pad accidents, transportation accidents, etc.

- 1062 - [January 16, 2015] - Bakken.com, Ken Ward Jr. | The Charleston Gazette, W.Va. - "Tomblin calls for study of increased deaths from gas-drilling boom"
"Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin is calling for a study aimed at reversing the increase in workplace deaths that has accompanied the boom in natural gas drilling and production from the Marcellus Shale fields in Northern West Virginia.
In 2013, seven oil and gas industry workers died on the job in West Virginia, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Figures for 2014 are not yet available, and the bureau’s 2013 numbers are still preliminary."
- 1079 - [October 12, 2011] - The New York Times, Mike Soraghan / Greenwire - "In Fish-Kill Mystery, EPA Scientist Points at Shale Drilling"
"Was it coal miners whose runoff wiped out aquatic life in the stream where locals have long fished and picnicked? Or was it Marcellus Shale drillers and the briny discharge from their wells that created a toxic algae bloom that left a miles-long trail of rotting fish along the West Virginia-Pennsylvania state line?"
- 1087 - [October 7, 2014] - DESMOGBLOG.COM, Mike Gaworecki - "Confirmed: California Aquifers Contaminated With Billions Of Gallons of Fracking Wastewater"
"After California state regulators shut down 11 fracking wastewater injection wells last July over concerns that the wastewater might have contaminated aquifers used for drinking water and farm irrigation, the EPA ordered a report within 60 days.
It was revealed yesterday that the California State Water Resources Board has sent a letter to the EPA confirming that at least nine of those sites were in fact dumping wastewater contaminated with fracking fluids and other pollutants into aquifers protected by state law and the federal Safe Drinking Water Act."
- 1090 - [January 14, 2015] - RT Question More., RT Question More. - "Gas pipeline explodes at Ross Barnett Reservoir in Mississippi"
"A natural gas pipeline exploded at the Ross Barnett Reservoir in Mississippi on Wednesday morning, causing a massive fire, local US media reported. There have been no immediate reports of injuries.
The pipeline belongs to the Gulf South Pipeline, according to WAPT. The system transports gas between several states, including Texas, Louisiana, Alabama, Mississippi, and Florida. Crews at the scene have shut off the gas following the explosion, company officials said."
- 1091 - [October 23, 2014] - RT Question More., RT Question More. - "Massive gas pipeline inferno shakes German town (VIDEOS)"
"A gas pipeline blast in Germany has killed one person and injured 11 others. The conflagration resulted in 200-meter tall flames that were captured from all angles by local residents who were lucky enough to escape the inferno.
...At least 25 buildings were also damaged in the blast. The fire left a crater 10 meters in diameter and 5 to 6 meters deep."
- 1093 - [January 21, 2015] - Bakken.com, Associated Press - "Montana city tries to fix water system tainted by oil spill"
"Authorities scrambled to decontaminate a water system serving 6,000 eastern Montana residents after a cancer-causing component of oil was found downstream of a Yellowstone River pipeline spill.
Up to 50,000 gallons of crude oil was released Saturday, and elevated levels of benzene were found Monday in samples from the water treatment plant serving the agricultural community of Glendive near the North Dakota border."
- 1111 - [January 23, 2015] - Bakken.com, The Associated Press - "Montana oil spill adds to fears about proposed pipeline"
"A pipeline oil spill in Montana that contaminated a river and a city’s drinking water supply is adding to fears about a proposed pipeline to carry oil from western North Dakota to a terminal in Illinois for distribution to refineries in eastern states.
“If the pipeline fails — and there are plenty of examples of these types of pipelines failing — and cleanup costs exceed what Dakota Access can pay, who is going to end up paying?” Aaron Johnson asked members of South Dakota’s Public Utilities Commission, which must approve a construction permit.
Some at the hearing voiced support for the project, citing a promised economic boost and the value of pipelines in pushing the country toward independence from foreign oil."
- 1113 - [January 22, 2015] - Fox News, Associated Press - "Cleanup underway for toxic saltwater spill in North Dakota"
"Cleanup is underway after nearly 3 million gallons of brine, a salty, toxic byproduct of oil and natural gas production, leaked from a pipeline in western North Dakota, the largest spill of its kind in the state since the current energy boom began.
The full environmental impact of the spill, which contaminated two creeks, might not be clear for months. Some previous saltwater spills have taken years to clean up. A contractor hired by the pipeline operator will be on site Thursday, assessing the damage.
A network of saltwater pipelines extends to hundreds of disposal wells in the western part of the state, where the briny water is pumped underground for permanent storage."
- 1114 - [January 22, 2015] - CBS Pittsburgh, Ross Guidotti | KDKA - "NA"
"A major cleanup effort continues in Fayette County after a train derailed this morning, nearly hitting some nearby homes.
Seven massive hopper cars of the 80-car frack sand hauler derailed. All were carrying up to 135,000 pounds of sand, some of it spilling along the tracks.
Southwest Pennsylvania Railroad operates the short line, which carries mostly Marcellus Shale products."
- 1167 - [January 26, 2015] - WTRF.com, WTRF.com - "UPDATE: Fire Under Control at Gas Line Explosion Site; Crews on Stand-by"
"Firefighters and emergency responders were placed on stand-by as they wait for a fire caused by a gas pipeline explosion to burn out in Brooke County.
The gas pipeline, owned by The Enterprise Products, L.P. based in Houston, TX, erupted about 10:30 a.m. sending flames hundreds of feet into the air.
Follansbee Fire Chief Larry Rea said the fire is contained, but all crews can do is standby until the fire burns itself out. Rea said they did manage to shut off three valves to the pipeline."
- 1176 - [January 27, 2015] - Marcellus.com, The Associated Press - "Gas line fire reported in Smith County"
"Firefighters in Smith County are at the scene of a natural gas line fire Monday in a rural area west of Raleigh.
Greg Flynn, a spokesman for the Mississippi Emergency Management Agency, says all 5 workers were present when the explosion happened but no injuries have been reported."
- 1177 - [January 22, 2015] - Marcellus.com, Beatriz Alvarado | Corpus Christi Caller-Times, Texas - "No injuries reported in plant fire"
"Billowing fireballs over the Southcross Energy natural gas plant in Gregory were seen miles from the site.
San Patricio County Sheriff Leroy Moody said emergency crews were called to the 5500 block of Farm-to-Market Road 136 about 6 p.m. for an explosion at the plant, which processes natural gas.
William Zagorski Sr., San Patricio County Emergency Management coordinator, said all pipelines funneling gas to the plant were shut off after the explosion and the fire was left to burn on its own, which took about two hours."
- 1183 - [January 27, 2015] - Bakken.com, REGINA GARCIA CANO | The Associated Press - "EPA: 4M gallons pumped from North Dakota saltwater spill"
"More than 4 million gallons of a mixture of fresh water, brine and oil have been pumped from the area affected by the largest saltwater spill of North Dakota’s current energy boom, according to a report issued Monday by the Environmental Protection Agency.
The report provides an overall assessment on the nearly 3 million-gallon spill of saltwater generated by oil drilling that leaked from a ruptured pipeline that operator Summit Midstream Partners LLC detected on Jan. 6. It remains unclear exactly when the spill occurred and what caused it.
Saltwater, known as brine, is an unwanted byproduct of oil and natural gas production that is much saltier than sea water and may also contain petroleum and residue from hydraulic fracturing operations. Some previous saltwater spills have taken years to clean up."
- 1191 - [January 27, 2015] - TribLive | News, Mike Wereschagin - "NTSB: Better oversight needed to prevent natural gas pipeline accidents"
"Operators and regulators of the country's largest natural gas pipelines need to beef up safety to prevent major accidents such as the explosion that torched a section of Interstate 77 in Sissonville, W.Va., the National Transportation Safety Board said in a report issued Tuesday.
The frequency of transmission pipeline accidents has leveled off in the 10 years since the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Administration issued its most recent set of safety rules, but there is “no evidence” of a decline in the accident rate, the NTSB found. The 2004 rules required gas companies to monitor the integrity of transmission lines in populated areas."
- 1229 - [February 2, 2015] - Bakken.com, Associated Press - "Big Montana oil spill is latest involving pipeline company"
"The Wyoming company whose pipeline leaked 30,000 gallons of crude oil into the Yellowstone River in Montana and its sister company have had multiple pipeline spills and federal fines levied against them in the last decade, according to government records.
Bridger Pipeline LLC, the operator of the Poplar Pipeline that broke recently near Glendive, Montana, recorded nine pipeline incidents between 2006 and 2014, according to the pipeline administration. Combined, they leaked nearly 11,000 gallons of crude.
Its sister company, Belle Fourche Pipeline Co., recorded 21 incidents over the same period, during which a total of 272,832 gallons of oil was spilled."
- 1241 - [January 19, 2015] - WTRF.com, Nate Fluharty | CONNECT - "UPDATED: All Evacuated Residents in Monroe County Back Home"
"All the families displaced by the Monroe County gas leak can return home after crews had been busy trying to cap a leaking well head all day Tuesday.
These families have been forced out of their homes for over a week now, but tonight they are back, "I haven't had it that bad, a lot of people had it worse that had kids and so on, you know....
"The well head is still blowing gas in the air, but it is blowing straight up into the air. We have brought everybody back within a close radius, but the people closest to the well have not," added Rocky Roberts, Senior Vice Presidents of Operations for Triad Hunter."
- 1247 - [February 2, 2015] - Marcellus.com, The Janesville Gazette (Janesville, Wis.) - "Editorial: Dig deeper into Enbridge pipeline with impact statement"
"“Everybody is concerned about the safety of their communities, and Enbridge is, too. We definitely want to work with communities so they feel safe with the pipeline and understand that Enbridge is working to protect that community.”
— Enbridge paid $1.1 million to settle DNR allegations of more than 100 environmental violations, including degrading wetlands, streams and private properties, during Line 61 construction."
- 1255 - [January 31, 2015] - Aljazeera America NEWS / HE SCRUTINEER, Renee Lewis - "'Breaking' news: January sees five major pipeline leaks"
"“Maybe this is just how pipelines celebrate January, but all over the country, pipelines new and old are popping off like roman candles,” said MSNBC host Rachel Maddow. Maddow noticed, as did the residents of several states, that there have been five major pipeline ruptures this month.
The number of major oil- and gas- pipeline accidents has been steadily growing in recent years. A major accident is defined by the U.S. Department of Transportation as one in which a person is killed or hospitalized because of injury, an explosion or fire occurred, more than five barrels of liquid are released or the total cost of the response exceeds $50,000.
In 2014, there were 73 major accidents, according to a review by the Associated Press — an 87 percent increase over 2009."
- 1256 - [Januaray 27, 2015] - msnbc, THE RACHEL MADDOW SHOW - "Another day, another pipeline explosion"
"Rachel Maddow reports on a natural gas pipeline in Brooke County, West Virginia that exploded in a huge fireball, the fifth pipeline accident in the U.S. so far this month. Duration: 3:36"
- 1264 - [February 6, 2015] - the Almanac, Scott Beveridge and Mike Jones - "Catastrophe avoided at Marcellus well pad fire"
"A catastrophe was avoided Feb. 4 when a large fire broke out at a Marcellus Shale natural gas well pad because the North Strabane Township drilling operation was only in the beginning stages, officials said.
The DEP was still attempting Feb. 5 to determine how much oil leaked from a hydraulic line and what caused the substance to catch fire at Range Resources’ Jeffries Elisabeth pad off Ross Road.
Regulators also were investigating to determine how much oil leaked from the ruptured line and what it was connected to on the pad, Poister said."
- 1289 - [May 25, 2011] - Weschester Gasette, Associated Press - "When a Tornado Hits a Drilling Site"
"An El Reno official says 20 workers at an oil and gas rig were hurt when a possible tornado moved through the area.
Community Services Director Terry Floyd also said Tuesday that the storm did extensive damage to the rig, as well as a Devon Energy production plant and a metal business.
Floyd said he didn't know the extent of the workers' injuries at the rig owned by Cactus Drilling. Emergency workers also contained a gas leak caused by damage to the plant, and damage was reported to Calumet Industries, a metal business."
- 1356 - [Februay 5, 2015] - TriveLive | News, Jason Cato | Trib Total Media - "Hydraulic line rupture sparked Washington County drill site fire"
"A ruptured hydraulic line ignited a fire at a Washington County gas drilling site, a Range Resources spokesman said Thursday.
No one was injured in the fire Wednesday evening at the company's Jeffries drilling location off Ross Road in North Strabane.
It likely will take at least a few weeks before more detailed information is available, Range Resources spokesman Matt Pitzarella said."
- 1376 - [February 16, 2015] - Reuters Edition US, Kara Van Pelt - "CSX train hauling North Dakota oil derails, cars ablaze in West Virginia"
"A CSX Corp train hauling North Dakota crude derailed in West Virginia on Monday, setting a number of cars ablaze, destroying a house and forcing the evacuation of two towns in the second significant oil-train incident in three days.
One or two of the cars plunged into the Kanawha River, and “a couple are burning," said Robert Jelacic, night shift manager of the West Virginia Department of Homeland Security and Emergency Management. There were no injuries or deaths, he said.
CSX said the train was hauling 109 cars from North Dakota to the coastal town of Yorktown, Virginia, where midstream firm Plains All American Pipelines runs an oil depot. It said one person was being treated for potential fume inhalation."
- 1380 - [February 17, 2015] - Bakken.com, Reuters - "Derailed CSX train in W. Virginia hauled newer-model tank cars"
"A CSX Corp oil train that derailed and erupted in flames in West Virginia on Monday was hauling newer model tank cars, not the older versions widely criticized for being prone to puncture, the firm said.
All of the oil tank cars on the 109-car train were CPC 1232 models, CSX said late Monday. The train, which was carrying North Dakota crude to an oil depot in Yorktown, Virginia, derailed in a small town 33 miles (54 km) southeast of Charleston.
The CPC 1232 is the newer, supposedly tougher version of the DOT-111 cars that were manufactured up until 2011. The DOT-111 cars have been faulted by regulators and operators for a number of years. U.S. and Canadian authorities, under pressure to address a spate of fiery accident, are seeking to phase out the older models."
- 1381 - [February 17, 2015] - Bakken.com, Reuters - "Update: CSX train hauling North Dakota oil derails, cars ablaze in W. Virginia"
"A CSX Corp train hauling North Dakota crude derailed in West Virginia on Monday, setting a number of cars ablaze, destroying a house and forcing the evacuation of two towns in the second significant oil-train incident in three days.
One or two of the cars plunged into the Kanawha River, said Robert Jelacic of the West Virginia Department of Homeland Security and Emergency Management.
CSX said the train was hauling 109 cars from North Dakota to the coastal town of Yorktown, Virginia, where midstream firm Plains All American Pipelines runs an oil depot. It said one person was being treated for potential inhalation of fumes. No other injuries or deaths were reported."
- 1412 - [January 9, 2015] - MetroNews, The Voice of West Virginia, Chris Lawrence in News - "Bakken crude recent history recounted on Talkline"
"The oil carried by the CSX tanker train which derailed and exploded in Mount Carbon. W.Va. was not the crude normally associated with the oil industry. Bakken Crude from North Dakota is considerably more explosive and flammable than most.
“It’s gassier and has more ethane and propane and dissolved gasses in the crude,” said Wall Street Journal Reporter Russell Gold during an appearance on MetroNews Talkline Wednesday. “That’s not really an issue until a train car goes off the tracks and ruptures.”"
- 1413 - [February 18, 2015] - MetroNews, The Voice of West Virginia, Jeff Jenkins in News - "Various federal, state agencies unite at derailment site"
"The state Department of Environmental Protection said it has yet to determine the full scope of the environmental impact of Monday’s CSX oil train derailment at Mount Carbon in Fayette County.
DEP spokeswoman Kelley Gillenwater said the focus Wednesday continued to be containment. She said the top priority continues to be making sure no crude oil gets into the Kanawha River. An additional boom was installed in a containment trench Wednesday.
Gillenwater said once the burned cars and other debris is removed, soil testing and soil evacuation will begin.
The oil that has leaked thus far into Armstrong Creek has been caught by ice and booms. Gillenwater said 5,000 gallons of an oil-water mix was vacuumed Tuesday night. Water samples of the river continue to be non-detect."
- 1439 - [March 9, 2015] - CBCNews | Sudbury, CBC News - "Train carrying crude oil derails near Gogama, Ont."
"Several tanker cars caught fire after a Canadian National Railway train carrying crude oil derailed in northern Ontario, prompting officials to advise nearby residents to stay indoors and avoid consuming water from local sources.
CN said its crew reported the derailment to emergency services at about 2:45 a.m. ET Saturday. Police said the train was 30 to 40 cars in length and 10 cars went off the track four kilometres northwest of Gogama, Ont. There were no reports of injuries.
Some of the rail cars that caught fire entered the Mattagami River System, CN and police said."
- 1442 - [Wintr 2010] - Cleveland Environment, Tim Kovac - "Burn on, big river"
"Forty five years ago today, the Cuyahoga River caught fire (for the 13th time). While this was nowhere near the largest or most substantial of those dozen fires, it did prove to be the most significant historically. The attention the fire gained combined with other significant environmental disasters – including the 1969 San Bernandino oil spill – to help catalyze action. "
- 1459 - [August 11, 2013] - Examiner.com, Deborah Dupree - Human Rights Examiner - "Sixth fracking explosion prompts government cease and desist order"
"After a sixth fracking explosion injured a worker and sent a tank flying 100 feet, government has shut down a repeat offender drill company based in West Virginia with a cease and desist order and a violation notice. The orders come as America's main oil and gas trade group prepares to launch yet another aggressive campaign to promote non-renewable energy.
Repeat environmental, safety, and human rights offender, at least since 2010, Jay-Bee Oil and Gas has been shut down after its latest "fraccident" (fracking accident) when a worker was injured in an explosion that sent a tank flying last week."
- 1511 - [March 19, 2015] - Bakken.com, The Associated Press - "Nearly 12K gallons of saltwater spill in northern ND"
"North Dakota oil regulators say nearly 12,000 gallons of saltwater have spilled at a disposal well in the northern part of the state.
Alison Ritter with the Oil and Gas Division says Petro Harvester Operating Company, LLC, reported the incident Wednesday. The operator says 11,970 gallons of saltwater were released at the Peterson 2 saltwater disposal well in Bottineau County, about six miles north of Maxbass.
Saltwater is an unwanted byproduct of oil production and is considered an environmental hazard by the state. It is many times saltier than sea water and can easily kill vegetation exposed to it"
- 1553 - [March 21, 2015] - WV Public Broadcsing, Dave Mistich & Jesse Wright - "With More Proposed Pipelines, Here's a Look at West Virginia's Recent Accidents"
"Two major interstate projects have been proposed for West Virginia: The Atlantic Coast and Mountain Valley pipelines. The goal is to create infrastructure that can carry natural gas from hydraulic fracturing operations in the Marcellus and Utica shale areas to markets in the East and South East.
...Both the ACP and MVP would be 42 inches in diameter, the largest transmission lines yet to be built in West Virginia. The lines would carry 2 billion cubic feet of gas per day up to 1,440 psi. Both projects require 125-foot temporary construction easements and 75-foot permanent easements. The lines would be buried about 3 feet underground.
...Opponents of the projects have cited health and safety concerns, among other issues.
Should there be a catastrophic failure of the line, the blast zone at full pressure could be up to 1,150 feet. The safe evacuation zone would be more than a mile away."
- 1628 - [October 30, 2014] - Earth Justice, Earth Justice - "Maryland and Fracking"
"Maryland is home to a relatively small slice of the Marcellus shale that runs along the western panhandle of the state. But the potential impacts to drinking water could be huge. Recognizing the risk to the state’s 5.7 million residents, state legislators have so far been cautious about allowing gas development in the state.
Below is a map of some of the high profile incidents ("fraccidents") related to the country's gas drilling boom that have already occurred in and around Maryland. Click on any fraccident to learn more."
- 1675 - [April 9, 2015] - The Intelligencer, Wheeling News-Register, CASEY JUNKINS , The Intelligencer / Wheeling News-Register - "'Heavy Rains' Cited In Marshall Pipeline Failure"
"Williams Energy officials believe wet weather over the last few days disturbed Marshall County's landscape enough to cause two of its natural gas pipelines to rupture in less than three hours late Thursday.
Williams' contractors and West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection investigators worked Friday to determine how much Marcellus shale condensate infiltrated Little Grave Creek after a 4-inch conduit broke northeast of Glen Dale shortly before 8 p.m. Thursday. Officials also continued evaluating the impact of the 12-inch pipeline rupture that occurred in the Bane Lane area of the county along U.S. 250 around 10:50 p.m. Thursday."
- 1691 - [February 1, 2015] - The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Laura Legere / Pittsburgh Post-Gazette - "At well sites across Pa., pictures help tell the story"
"Pennsylvania’s traditional oil and gas companies have asked for evidence that their impact on the environment could justify stronger regulations that the state wants to apply to their operations.
The state Department of Environmental Protection is preparing to show it to them in full color.
Regulators have compiled hundreds of photographs taken by field inspectors in recent years to document violations at traditional, shallow well sites — small, often family-run operations that predate the Marcellus Shale drilling boom by generations and have continued pumping in its shadow."
- 1702 - [October 4, 2014] - CommonDreams, Andrea Germanos - "Explosion at Fracking Well Sparks Fire Set to Rage for Days"
"An explosion at a natural gas fracking well in Pennsylvania on Tuesday has sent one person to the hospital, left one person injured and sparked a fire that could take days to contain.
According to a statement from well operator Chevron, the fire broke out at approximately 6:45 Tuesday morning at their well in Dunkard Township in Greene County, about 50 miles south of Pittsburgh."
- 1703 - [February 11, 2014] - Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Molly Born and Sean D. Hamill / Pittsburgh Post-Gazette - "Greene County shale well continues burning"
"It is the worst fear of anyone who works on a natural gas well.
A spark or an error on the job results in a potentially deadly well fire that burns out of control, causing even more danger to the experts who have to be flown in to contain the blaze.
That's the situation in Dunkard, Greene County, after something caused a Marcellus Shale gas well owned by Chevron to catch fire just before 7 a.m. Tuesday, leaving one employee with a minor injury and another worker missing and feared dead."
- 1704 - [February 12, 2014] - The Columbus Dispatch, Laura Arenschield - "Evacuated families in Monroe County await answers on fracking-well gas leak"
"This hollow used to be peaceful.
Not long ago, Randy Heater and his daughters would roam the Monroe County hills to hunt, setting up deer stands on quiet fall days when the air was still.
On Dec. 13, that stillness shattered.
Crews lost control of a fracked well on a hilltop near Heater’s house. Natural gas surged into the air.
From their backyard, less than a mile from the well, the Heaters heard it. The rushing gas sounded like a broken air hose, Heater said — a deep, steady WHOOOOSH.
As the weekend approached, gas was still spewing uncontrollably."
- 1705 - [December 22, 2014] - The Columbus Dispatch, Laura Arenschield - "Fracking fire points out failings"
"Phillip Keevert, the only paid firefighter in Monroe County, was working a diesel spill on the morning of June 28 when a 911 dispatcher called his cellphone about another emergency.
Keevert was out of range of the county’s radio system, so he got in his truck and drove toward town. As he got closer, the radio static gave way to snippets of conversation.
He heard the word “well.” More static. Then the word “fire.”
One tanker truck was on fire at a StatOil North America well pad in Clarington. Now, two trucks were on fire. Now, three."
- 1710 - [NA] - Bakken.com, The Associated Press - "Oil company coming to aid of ranchers affected by grass fire"
"An energy company operating in the western North Dakota oil patch is offering help to ranchers affected by a grass fire started by gas flares at an oil well.
The blaze earlier this month burned more than 4 ½ square miles in McKenzie County, damaging grazing land and destroying miles of fence line.
Whiting Petroleum has met with the U.S. Forest Service and with ranchers to offer help, and is supplying a crew to repair fences, Acting District Ranger Scot Shuler told The Bismarck Tribune."
- 1781 - [2012] - Bakken.com, Josh Funk | The Associated Press - "Investigators release records of fiery Casselton derailment"
"Federal investigators have released hundreds of pages of records that offer new insight into the moments just before and after a 2013 oil train derailment near Casselton, North Dakota, that created a massive fire and forced 1,400 people to evacuate for several days."
- 1783 - [April 28, 2015] - NewsChannel 4 - KFOR.com, Adam Snider - ""They just don't care as far as I can tell…" oil/water mix leaks into family farm"
"Oklahoma homeowners are furious, after a salt water mix leaks from a nearby oil and gas facility.
The leak sprung sometime late Tuesday afternoon, and as it ran into the family’s vegetation, they demanded to know what’s in it."
- 1803 - [NA] - Bakken.com, The Associated Press - "Recent oil train crashes in the US and Canada"
"Sweeping regulations to boost the safety of trains transporting crude oil, ethanol and other flammable liquids were announced Friday by U.S. and Canadian officials. The long-awaited regulations are a response to a series of oil train accidents in both countries over the last few years that have resulted in spectacular fires that burned for days."
- 1811 - [October 28, 2010] - Bakken.com, Maureen McMullen | Shale Plays Media - "North Dakota: Death Trap?"
"For the third year in a row, people died on the job in North Dakota than any other state in2015, The Guardian reports. According to an annual report from union federation AFL-CIO, 14.9 fatalities occurred per 100,000 workers—four times the national average and double the amount of work-related deaths in 2007."
- 1812 - [May 1, 2015] - theguardian, Jana Kasperkevic in New York - "About 150 US workers are killed on the job every day – report"
"About 150 US workers die every day from hazardous working conditions, according to a new report by the AFL-CIO, the largest federation of labor unions in the US.
In 2013, 4,585 US workers were killed on the job and an estimated 50,000 died from occupational diseases, found the report. Additionally, about 3.8m work-related injuries and illnesses were reported. The AFL-CIO estimates that the real number of work-related injuries is somewhere between 7.6m to 11.4m each year as many work-related injuries are not reported.
For the third year in a row, North Dakota was the deadliest state to work in the US."
- 1828 - [January 5, 2014] - EarthWorks, Tina Jensen - "Fracking fluid blows out nearby well"
"More than 200 barrels of fracking fluid, oil and water blew out of a traditional oil well on BLM land in the San Juan Basin in late September raising questions about who is responsible for the spill.
State regulators say the blowout on a Parko Oil well happened because of pressure from nearby fracking operations run by Encana Oil."
- 1840 - [NA] - Bakken.com, Zach Koppang | Shale Plays Media - "Update: ND town evacuated after oil train explosion"
"Wednesday morning at around 7:30 a.m. a portion of a 109-car oil train derailed near a small North Dakota town in Wells County, resulting in large fire involving numerous tank cars, prompting the evacuation of Heimdal and the surrounding area.
The Burlington Northern Sante Fe train hauling Bakken crude went off the tracks about two miles outside the unincorporated community. As of the 2010 census, Heimdal, located between Harvey and New Rockford, had a population of 27. The town is currently home to about 40 people."
- 1858 - [May 12, 2015] - Niobrarachalk.com - Powered by Shale Plays Media, Greeley Tribune, Colo. - "Oil, gas spill report for May 11"
"The following spills were reported to the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission in the past two weeks.
Information is based on Form 19, which operators must fill out detailing the leakage/spill events. Any spill release which may impact waters of the state must be reported as soon as practical. Any spill of five barrels or more must be reported within 24 hours, and any spill of one barrel or more which occurs outside secondary containment, such as metal or earthen berms, must also be reported within 24 hours, according to COGCC rules."
- 1881 - [May 10, 2015] - Bakken.com, The Associated Press - "9 oil well deaths lead to warning about inhaling chemicals"
" Federal officials are warning about the dangers of inhaling chemicals at oil wells following the deaths of nine workers over the last five years.
All of the deaths involved workers at crude production tanks. Colorado and North Dakota each had three deaths and Texas, Oklahoma and Montana each had one death."
- 1883 - [May 18, 2015] - Bakken.com, Zach Koppang | Shale Plays Media - ""Oil To Die For" explores the Bakken, the deadliest workplace in America (Video)"
"While working the night shift at a North Dakota oil well site, a 21-year-old Montana man climbed to the top of an oil storage tank to check its levels. Upon opening the hatch Dustin Bergsing was inundated by toxic fumes and, according to North Dakota state forensic examiners, died from the inhalation of petroleum vapors.
The story has become tragically commonplace since the beginning of the shale revolution in western North Dakota. Since 2008, over 50 men have died at North Dakota oilfield sites."
- 1896 - [May 20, 2015] - Bakken.com, Matt Hamilton | The Los Angeles Times - "21,000 gallons of crude oil leaked near Santa Barbara County beaches"
"A ruptured pipeline near Santa Barbara leaked an estimated 21,000 gallons of crude oil Tuesday, some of which flowed into the ocean and left a thick coat of black tar along the county’s pristine shores, authorities said.
The rupture, located along an 11-mile long underground pipe that’s part of a larger oil transport network bound for Kern County, was first reported about noon after a woman at Refugio State Beach in Goleta smelled the crude’s noxious fumes. Coast Guard crews stopped the leak by 3 p.m., said Coast Guard Petty Officer Andrea Anderson."
- 1921 - [November 9, 2011] - Marcellus.com, Zach Koppang | Shale Plays Media - ""Oil To Die For" explores the Bakken, the deadliest workplace in America (Video)"
"While working the night shift at a North Dakota oil well site, a 21-year-old Montana man climbed to the top of an oil storage tank to check its levels. Upon opening the hatch Dustin Bergsing was inundated by toxic fumes and, according to North Dakota state forensic examiners, died from the inhalation of petroleum vapors."
- 1953 - [June 9, 2015] - InsideClimateNews, Lisa Song, InsideClimate News - "Well Explosion Douses Texas Neighborhood Already Weary of Fracking"
"Jeanne Shepherd was on her way to a church gathering when an oil and gas well in Karnes County, Texas blew its top on Tuesday afternoon. A mixture of liquid petroleum products gushed high into the air. Some of it splashed onto Shepherd’s truck, coating her windshield in an opaque, milky film.
Shepherd said the well looked like the Old Faithful geyser in Yellowstone National Park. "It spewed and it spewed … It was all over everywhere, and I knew I wasn't going home that night," she said."
- 2024 - [NA] - Zero Hedge, Tyler Durden - "Why Are Oil & Gas Workers Mysteriously Dying Across America?"
"In July of 2012, the mother of 21-year old Dustin Bergsing filed a wrongful-death suit in Yellowstone County District Court. Bergsing died on January 7 of that year — his first child was born just six weeks prior. The cause of death was hydrocarbon poisoning. More specifically, Bergsing died from inhaling fatal amounts of petroleum vapors after gauging a crude oil tank on a Marathon Oil site in Mandaree, North Dakota. Here is what happened (from a North Dakota Supreme Court apellee brief):"
- 2032 - [NA] - Fox News, Fox News - "Texas pipeline rupture causes fire and evacuations, but no injuries"
"Seven homes were evacuated in southeastern Texas late Sunday after a natural gas pipeline ruptured, sparking a massive fire.
Spokeswoman Peggy Fonseca with the DeWitt County Emergency Operations Center says an Energy Transfer Partners pipeline ruptured near Lindenau, in a rural area of the county, around 8 p.m. Sunday. Fonseca said that gas had been rerouted away from the damaged pipeline and the fire had been extinguished as of midnight Monday."
- 2035 - [May 4, 2015] - HUFF POST GREEN, Jesse Coleman - "Fracking Blowout in Texas Causes Huge Dead Zone (PHOTOS)"
"Despite statements from industry officials and political leaders, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency officials say that their new study of the nation’s natural gas boom should not be described as proof that the nation’s water supplies are safe from hydraulic fracturing.
EOF
Despite statements from industry officials and political leaders, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency officials say that their new study of the nation’s natural gas boom should not be described as proof that the nation’s water supplies are safe from hydraulic fracturing.
title: EPA says new study doesn’t show fracking is safe
source: Sunday Gazette-Mail
authors: Ken Ward Jr., Staff writer
date: June 7,2015
href: http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150607/GZ01/150609432
webpages: contamination
link_id: 2037
EOF
paragraph: The Bakken oil boom has been a serial killer. Big oil companies have largely written the rules governing their own accountability for accidents, potentially putting workers at risk.
title: 'Workers Are Paying For Cheap Gas With Their Lives'
source: PoliticoMagazine
authors: Jennifer Gollan
date:
href: http://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2015/06/bakken-oil-fields-investigation-118991.html#.VX7MI0bg-HM
webpages: accident
link_id: 2036
EOF
paragraph: The same week that Texas Governor Greg Abbott signed a bill stripping local communities of their ability to control the oil and gas industry, a fracking well exploded in south Texas, spraying a toxic mix of chemicals and forcing the evacuation of 20 families."
- 2036 - [NA] - PoliticoMagazine, Jennifer Gollan - "'Workers Are Paying For Cheap Gas With Their Lives'"
"A recent spate of earthquakes across the United States has raised concerns that hydraulic fracturing — fracking — is the cause.
Several states with strong fracking industries have seen an uptick in seismic activity. North Texas, for example, has undergone a flurry of earthquakes. Oklahoma experienced more magnitude-3 quakes last year than California. Earlier this month, Michigan suffered an earthquake with a magnitude of 4.2.
A recent spate of earthquakes across the United States has raised concerns that hydraulic fracturing — fracking — is the cause.
title: No evidence fracking causes earthquakes
source: Lompoc Record.com
authors: Merrill Matthews is a resident scholar with the Institute for Policy Innovation in Dallas.
date: 6/7/2015
href: http://lompocrecord.com/news/opinion/editorial/commentary/no-evidence-fracking-causes-earthquakes/article_c61d234d-362a-5279-bb1d-d4d2b51cc2bc.html
webpages: seismic
link_id: 2038
EOF
Despite statements from industry officials and political leaders, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency officials say that their new study of the nation’s natural gas boom should not be described as proof that the nation’s water supplies are safe from hydraulic fracturing.
title: EPA says new study doesn’t show fracking is safe
source: Sunday Gazette-Mail
authors: Ken Ward Jr., Staff writer
date: June 7,2015
href: http://www.wvgazette.com/article/20150607/GZ01/150609432
webpages: contamination
link_id: 2037
EOF
paragraph: The Bakken oil boom has been a serial killer. Big oil companies have largely written the rules governing their own accountability for accidents, potentially putting workers at risk."